August 10, 2015 Darren

That first Race 07 Win

After a 6 year spell gaming on the Xbox 360, I made the switch in 2010 back to PC gaming and purchased a Logitech G27. I stumbled across Race 07 which seemed like a decently priced WTCC simulation.

Race 07 was always my guilty pleasure, my go to game away from any of the websites I was running. Hours were spent racing the FWD Honda Accord Touring car around a multitude of locations. Regularly, you would go online and find multiple 25 car sprint lobbies, usually with hilarious first lap carnage. Running a website based around fast clean and fair racing meant Race 07 quickly became escapism, being able to participate in matchmaking based throwaway racing.

Inevitably, someone came onto the Apex Racing League and wanted to run a Touring Car competition on Race 07. This was my opportunity to race against some of my good friends, and new acquaintances. Having a team championship we tended to see at least 10-12 cars on the grid, on what was a relatively old game at the time.

There were a couple of races which I remember well, one was a fight through the field at Monza finishing 2nd after a cheeky overtake into Parabolica on the last lap, another involving a comedy of errors at Brands Hatch and its pit entrance, involving the entire team. The most unusual situation I found myself in was during Race 2 at Macau in the first season. Strangely, I had managed to get away well and found myself overtaking for the lead against my teammate Conrad into the Lisboa Bend. After increasing the gap to about 4 seconds, and pushing hard before my pitstop I made the fatal mistake of binning it into the wall from the lead, at Fishermans Bend.

The moment the engine turned itself off was a sad moment.

Race 07 was not all doom and gloom though, with victory coming at Magny Cours in Season 2, and a 1,2,3 by Apex Racing UK. Looking back at the video, I think Conrad in the black car was perhaps a bit too fair and let me have it rather than fight hard.

In the end, Race 07 died on the ARL. This was due to the usual few individuals who wanted to continually argue about the rules, plan elaborate year long competitions and yet only find it within themselves to attend 20% of the events. Figures